While technology has redefined the way we communicate — and in many ways, made the landline seem like more of a novelty — these ads from eras past remind us of how easily we can be convinced that something we all do, perhaps now more than ever, was favored by one gender over another. Take...

To celebrate National Bike Week and the curious coincidences that we as women sometimes encounter when faced with the wonders of advertising, we're taking a look back at ads urging us to push past our monthly magical visit from the menses to get back on those two wheels and ride off into the...

This particular treat beckons those who breathe vintage and are game for a mini festival next weekend. The great spectacle, happening at London's Southbank Centre, will celebrate seven patriotic decades in a mix bag of fashion, music, dance, art and design. All in the measure of three...

" For our latest stylebook, Girl Meets Glam, we hoped to depict Valentine's Day style in a kitschy, playful, vintage catalog way. A pink background seemed perfect for that. There's a whole lotta pink in this stylebook, and we're glad if you like it! However, we realize that marketing and...

In fact, they've even evolved since the 20th century, as evidenced by these vintage ads that imply that women wear makeup to attract a mate — or have they? Let's investigate! "Nothing draws a man to a woman like Crushed Rose," states the ad above. "You smooth it on, and suddenly, love is...

There are tons of successful working single mothers in reality, so why is it so shocking to see them on TV? You know we can't talk about Vintage Sexism in the workplace without getting into Mad Men! No matter how much we swoon over the vintage garb, our scorn over how its female stars are...

In honor of National Novel Writing Month, we're exploring the subtle, and not-so-subtle, sexism of pulp book art in this month's Vintage Sexism. Image via Flickr Above we have the cover of Richard Deming's 1960 novel, Hit and Run, about a detective who offers to cover up evidence of a...

Take a look at the ads in this edition of Vintage Sexism, and you'll see adjectives like 'unsightly,' 'unwanted,' and 'ugly,' used to describe feminine body hair. At what point did the notion of naturally occurring hair become so unbecoming in our culture? In 1982, Christine Hope wrote...

 

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